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Biomedical Reviews

Morphological transformation of sensory ganglion neurons and satellite cells

Seiji Matsuda, Naoto Kobayashi, Hiroyuki Wakisaka, Shouichiro Saito, Kyouko Saito, Kyojy Miyawaki, Katsumi Mominoki, Kazuhiro Shigemoto, Shingo Murakami, Takashi Fujiwara

Abstract

The development of sensory ganglion neurons and satellite cells examined by scanning electron microscopy after removal of the connective tissue is reviewed. Sensory neurons are bipolar at early stages of development and later became pseudounipolar. This maturation event starts earlier but proceeds more slowly in chick than in rat embryos. These may due to the difference in the extent and intimacy of satellite cell investments between these two animal species. The neuronal perikaryal projections are observed by scanning electron microscopy after removal of the connective tissue and satellite cells. The morphometric analysis reveals that perikaryal projections are more numerous on the surface of mature pseudounipolar neurons than on that of premature bipolar neurons; they increase in number as the neuronal cell bodies grow larger. This may support the hypothesis that perikaryal projections are structural devices for increasing the neuron-satellite interface and for improving the efficiency of metabolic exchange between these two cell types.The important role of satellite cells in neuronal maturation is discussed.

Biomedical Reviews 2000; 11: 39-52.


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.14748/bmr.v11.129

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About The Authors

Seiji Matsuda
Ehime University School of Medicine
Japan

Naoto Kobayashi
Ehime University School of Medicine
Japan

Hiroyuki Wakisaka
Ehime University School of Medicine
Japan

Shouichiro Saito
Ehime University School of Medicine
Japan

Kyouko Saito
Ehime University School of Medicine
Japan

Kyojy Miyawaki
Ehime University School of Medicine
Japan

Katsumi Mominoki
Ehime University School of Medicine
Japan

Kazuhiro Shigemoto
Ehime University School of Medicine
Japan

Shingo Murakami
Nagoya City University Medical School
Japan

Takashi Fujiwara
Ehime University School of Medicine
Japan

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