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Patients on methadone therapy and sleep apnea

Christiana Madjova, Simeon Chokanov, Mario Milkov

Abstract

Introduction: Methadone is an opioid, which is prescribed for the treatment and management of opioid addiction. Despite its frequent use, caution should be exercised as it has side effects. Assessment of the patient's clinical condition may be influenced and exacerbated by respiratory side effects. Sleep apnea is one of the side effects, which are observed in patients, treated with methadone.

Aim: The aim of the study is to see if there are interactions between methadone treatment and sleep apnea and if so - to determine how much methadone affects sleep.

Materials and Methods: In this study, we examined 36 patients, addicted to drugs and treated with methadone. To compare the results we received, we used database articles from Medline, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Google Scholar, PubMed, Springer Link, Journals of Sleep Medicine and Anesthesia and Analgesia, as well as other non-indexed pages.

Results: From the survey we established: 80.6% (29) of patients on methadone therapy have problems with sleep; 9 (25%) have insomnia; 38.9% (14) feel morning fatigue; 16.1% (13) experience daytime sleepiness and 36.1% have a change in mood; 19.4% (7) of respondents say that their sleep is short and 16.7% report snoring; 75% do not have problems with falling asleep and 30.6% wake up frequently during the night.

Conclusion: Our study found that the majority of drug addicts reported poor sleep quality. In the treatment of patients with sleep apnea as a result of opioids, collaboration between specialists, monitoring of patients and a combination of different types of sleep apnea treatment is extremely important.


Keywords

opioids, methadone therapy, sleep apnea, central sleep apnea

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